Section 1 (Pimlico-Belgravia) – consultation on route options by Westminster City Council

Closed 14 Sep 2014

Opened 9 Jul 2014

Overview

Westminster City Council’s draft Cycling Strategy, consulted on earlier this year, sets out how the Council intends to help deliver the Mayor’s Vision for Cycling on a more local level, taking account of Westminster’s unique circumstances and challenges. The strategy included draft cycle route alignments that would form part of a Central London Cycle Grid, one of which was the route for Barclays Cycle Superhighway Route 5 through Pimlico and Belgravia.

There are three options for the area between Drummond Gate and Belgrave Square (see map). Each option has different opportunities and constraints. Please tell us which you prefer and if you have any suggestions on ways to improve them.

  • Option One: cyclists in both directions travel on Belgrave Road, Eccleston Street and Belgrave Place (Route 1). This would require a contraflow cycle lane for southbound cyclists on Eccleston Bridge, Eccleston Street and Belgrave Place.

 

For more details on Option 1, click here

 

  • Option Two: northbound cyclists travel on Belgrave Road, Eccleston Street and Belgrave Place (Route 1). Southbound cyclists would travel on Lyall Street, Elizabeth Street and St George’s Drive (Route 2). There would be segregated tracks and new traffic signals to separate southbound cyclists from coaches in the vicinity of the Victoria and Bulleid Way coach stations.

 

For more details on Option 2, click here

 

  • Option Three: as Option Two, but southbound cyclists turn right from Lyall Street into Ebury Street, then use Cundy Street, Ebury Square, Ebury Bridge, Sutherland Street and Lupus Street (Route 3)

 

For more details on Option 3, click here

 

Following this consultation, the City Council will be developing more detailed proposals on the chosen route option(s), aimed at improving facilities for all road users, especially vulnerable road users. Proposals could include improvements to traffic signal junctions with the implementation of pedestrian crossing facilities or the addition of pedestrian Countdown crossing information at signal junctions. By doing this, we hope to improve the overall environment along the route not just for cyclists but for all users of the road network.

These more detailed proposals will then be consulted on again next year for implementation in 2015/16.

 

For a larger version of this plan click here

 

Route Assessment

The City Council has undertaken an initial review of the streets that each of the route options will pass along to understand the nature and characteristics of the street. Each street has then been given a colour rating depending on the level of intervention that it believes would be required along this street to enable a safer cycling environment.

The assessment has been based on a number of different factors, including on-site observations, results from traffic volume and speed surveys undertaken and the type of street it is (e.g. direction of traffic flow, number of turning movements, parking and loading provision).

This assessment is intended as a guide to help to explain the different types of street environment that the route passes along and the implications for cyclists travelling along that street. The City Council would look to tailor any proposals to fit the characteristics of the street that the route passes along. This would mean more substantial measures in busier areas, but smaller scale improvements where the road environment is deemed to be more suitable to cycling safely already.

Each Street has been given a rating based on the outline details below:

  • Green (minimal / no intervention required), characterised by low traffic speeds and volumes, and/or existing high quality public realm.

 

  • Yellow (low intervention required), characterised by lower traffic speeds and volumes.

 

  • Orange (medium intervention required), characterised by higher traffic speeds and volumes, an increased proportion of large vehicles such as buses and HGVs, and greater kerbside activity e.g. parking bays on both sides of the street

 

  • Red (higher intervention), characterised by higher traffic speeds and volumes, higher numbers of large vehicles such as buses and HGVs, greater kerbside activity, and conflicting vehicle movements

 

Potential cycle measures (interventions)

These pictures are intended as a guide to help you understand what cycle measures could look like along different sections of the route.

Yellow category

This picture below shows how a proposed cycle measure could look for a “yellow” street category, (e.g.  along Lyall Street). The picture shows that cycle symbols could be used to guide cyclists along the route on this type of street.

 

Orange category

There are potentially two options for interventions in this category. Both options are pictured below, and the City Council would welcome your views on which option you would prefer.

Option A

The picture below shows how a proposed cycle measure could look for an “orange” street category (e.g. along Belgrave Road).

It shows a proposed 2m with-flow cycle lane, where the parking has been relocated to the outside of the lane. There is a 1m buffer zone between the cycle lane and the parking bay to allow for the opening of car doors and for car users to exit their vehicles safely. By relocating the parking to the outside of the cycle lane the cars provide a degree of segregation from the main road and this also reduces the need for cars to cross the cycle lane to access parking bays.

 

Option B

The picture below shows how a proposed cycle measure could look for an “orange” street category  (e.g. along Eccleston Street).

It shows a proposed 2m with-flow cycle lane, located on the outside of the existing parking bay. There is a 1m buffer zone between the cycle lane and the parking bay to allow for the opening of car doors and for car users to exit their vehicles safely.

 

Red category

The picture below shows how a proposed cycle measure could look for a “red” street category (e.g. along Ecclestone Bridge)

It shows a 1.75m cycle feeder lane segregated by a kerbed island on the approach to a cycle pre-signal. A cycle pre-signal would allow cyclists to proceed in advance of general traffic.

 

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