Section 6 - Portland Place, junction with Weymouth Street and junction with New Cavendish Street

Closed 20 Mar 2016

Opened 8 Feb 2016

Overview

We are asking for feedback on two different options:

  • Option A: Advisory cycle lanes on Portland Place
  • Option B: Segregated cycle lanes on Portland Place
     

Click here for a map comparing the two options (PDF)


Option A: Advisory cycle lanes on Portland Place

Portland Place

  • A 2m advisory cycle lane would be provided in both directions on Portland Place. It would be separated from the existing parking bays by a 0.5m buffer to reduce the risk of door strikes
     

Junction of Portland Place and Weymouth Street

  • Advanced Stop Lines would be provided on the Portland Place arms of the junction and the western arm of Weymouth Street (as Weymouth Street is one-way, an advanced stop line is not necessary on the eastern arm of the junction)
  • Cyclists would not be given a separate signal through the junction. Left turning vehicles on the northern arm of the junction would cross the cycle lane to reach the left turn lane on the approach to the junction. There is no left turn conflict on the southern arm of the junction because Weymouth Street is one-way in the westbound direction
  • Footways on either side of the southern arm of the junction would be widened to reduce the pedestrian crossing distance
     

Junction of Portland Place and New Cavendish Street

  • New Advanced Stop Lines would be provided on the northern and southern arms of the junction, and cyclists would cross the junction with general traffic.  There would be no conflict between southbound cyclists and left turning vehicles because New Cavendish Street is one-way in the westbound direction
  • A waiting area would be provided for southbound cyclists to turn right from Portland Place
  • The uncontrolled pedestrian crossings on the northern and western arms of the junction would be upgraded to signalised crossings
     

Link with Central London Grid route along New Cavendish Street

  • Westminster City Council are currently consulting on proposals for Central London Grid Route 7, which is planned to run along New Cavendish Street. This street is one-way in the westbound direction and it is proposed to enable two-way cycling, which would require a contra-flow cycle lane to be installed. The consultation can be viewed here
  • If the Westminster proposals for the grid route go ahead, the junction of New Cavendish Street and Portland Place would need to be redesigned to enable a separate signal for eastbound cyclists on New Cavendish Street. This is not currently shown on the plans for CS11
  • This would require further modelling work to be undertaken to ensure the junction could still operate effectively, and design changes may be necessary. A decision on whether to undertake this further work will be taken based on feedback from both the CS11 and the Grid Route 7 consultation
     

Changes to parking and loading

  • 12m of residents’ parking would be relocated from outside numbers 70-74  Portland Place to outside number 76 Portland Place
  • 10m of residents’ parking would be relocated from outside number 40 Portland Place to outside number 50 Portland Place
  • The diplomatic bays outside numbers 43-45 Portland Place would be moved approximately 3m further north
  • These changes are necessary to ensure the junctions with Weymouth Street and New Cavendish Street would operate as efficiently as possible


Option B: Segregated cycle lanes on Portland Place

Portland Place

  • A 1.5m cycle lane would be provided between the footway and the parking bays on Portland Place in both directions by moving the parking bays further out from the kerb
  • A 1m buffer would separate the cycle lane from the parking to reduce the risk of door strikes. The buffer would be flush with the carriageway and surfaced with a buff coloured surface dressing. A similar example can be seen on Hanover Street
     

Junction of Portland Place and Weymouth Street

  • Cyclists travelling north on Portland Place would cross the junction with general traffic. There would be no conflict with turning vehicles because Weymouth Street is one-way in the eastbound direction
  • Southbound cyclists would be given their own signal to cross the junction separately to motor traffic, to avoid conflict between cyclists and turning vehicles
  • Cyclists turning left from Portland Place into Weymouth Street eastbound would receive a green signal at the same time as the pedestrian crossings on Weymouth Street. Cyclists may be expected to stop at an internal stop line and wait until the pedestrian crossing had finished running before proceeding to exit the junction (the exact method of junction control would be confirmed during traffic modelling )
  • A waiting area would be provided for cyclists to turn right from Portland Place
  • New signalised pedestrian crossings would be provided on the eastern and southern arms of the junction with Weymouth Street
  • The existing pedestrian crossing on the northern arm of the junction would be made straight
     

Junction of Portland Place and New Cavendish Street

  • Cyclists travelling south on Portland Place would cross the junction with general traffic. There would be no conflict with turning vehicles, because New Cavendish Street is one-way in the westbound direction
  • Cyclists travelling north on Portland Place would cross the junction with general traffic. An Advanced Stop Line would be provided
  • A waiting area would be provided for cyclists to turn right from Portland Place
  • New signalised pedestrian crossings would be provided on the northern and western arms of the junction
     

Link with Central London Grid route along New Cavendish Street

  • Westminster City Council are currently consulting on proposals for Central London Grid, which is planned to run along New Cavendish Street. This street is one-way in the westbound direction and it is proposed to enable two-way cycling, which would require a contra-flow cycle lane to be installed. More information can be found on Westminster City Council’s website. If the Westminster proposals for the grid route go ahead, the junction of New Cavendish Street and Portland Place would need to be redesigned to enable a separate signal to be provided for eastbound cyclists on New Cavendish Street. This is not currently shown on the plans for CS11
  • This would require further modelling work to be undertaken to ensure the junction could still operate effectively, and design changes may be necessary. A decision on whether to undertake this further work will be taken based on feedback from both the CS11 and the Grid Route 7 consultation
     

Changes to parking and loading

  • There would be no changes to existing parking and loading provision in this location


How will this impact traffic?

These proposals would mean that journey times for general traffic and some bus routes would change. Some journeys would be expected to improve at certain times of day, particularly southbound traffic during the morning peak. Others would be expected to be longer at certain times of day, particularly around Swiss Cottage. The changes to the road layout and to park access would mean that some traffic would take a different route to get to its destination. Some borough roads would be likely to see an increase in traffic because of these proposals, while other borough roads would see a reduction in traffic volumes.

We would take a number of steps to ensure that the changes made along the route are balanced. TfL is investing in advanced traffic signal technology to allow us to better manage traffic depending on differing conditions at any given time, and we are working to improve road user information so people can make informed journey choices before they travel.

More detailed information on the traffic impacts of the CS11 proposals, including tables of the likely journey time impacts, can be found here.

Areas

  • Camden
  • Westminster

Audiences

  • Public
  • Stakeholders
  • Local residents
  • Local businesses
  • Schools
  • London Boroughs
  • Coach Operators
  • Taxi trade
  • Transport for London
  • Taxi customers and other stakeholders

Interests

  • Roads