Cycle Superhighway Route 2 upgrade – benefits and impacts to road users

Closed 2 Nov 2014

Opened 23 Sep 2014

Overview

 

Overall context

In recent years, two broad trends have been seen on inner London’s roads: a reduction in motor traffic and a rise in cycling. Motor traffic in inner London has fallen by around 8 per cent since 2006/07. On the Mile End Road, along which the Superhighway runs, traffic levels have fallen at the slightly slower rate of 5 per cent over the same period. However, traffic flows in inner London have stabilised and there have been signs of growth in the last year.

Cycling in London has more than doubled in the last decade. Bikes now make up around a quarter of rush hour traffic in central London - but there are few special routes or facilities for them.

This scheme aims to upgrade the current cycling facilities to reduce conflict between cyclists and motor vehicles and to provide safer, more comfortable journeys for cyclists.  The great majority of the road space would still be for motorists but part would be reallocated to cyclists. However, there are impacts – both benefits and disadvantages - for other users, which this page describes in more detail. The information is accompanied by a table of data. The numbers included in the text below are taken from column D, showing the difference between the current situation on–street and the situation expected if the scheme were to be implemented. Column B outlines the expected situation by December 2016 if the scheme were not to be delivered, taking account of the impact of other schemes planned for delivery by this date.

 

 

Pedestrians and environment

Shorter crossing times and more pedestrian space at some locations would be balanced by longer crossing times at other locations.  Four crossings which are currently two-stage (requiring pedestrians to wait in the middle of the road) would become straight-across, shortening crossing times. At some stand-alone crossings, wait times would not change. When crossing at junctions, average wait times on different arms of the junctions would go up by between 10 and 25 seconds. Pedestrian countdown would be installed at 15 signalised crossings along the route. Some pavement space would be freed up by moving some bus stops onto bus stop islands along the cycle route.

A new crossing would be installed in Whitechapel High Street as part of the Aldgate gyratory removal scheme. The existing crossing opposite the current entrance to Whitechapel Station is being moved temporarily for Crossrail works to opposite the new temporary entrance to the station. It will return to its original position when the works are complete.

 

General traffic (excluding buses)

There would be longer journeys for motor vehicles at the busiest times of day on this route. The traffic modelling analysis looks at journey times at the busiest single hour in the morning and evening peaks. The figures include the total effect not just of this scheme - the upgrade of Barclays Cycle Superhighway Route 2 - but also of 20 other traffic schemes to be delivered in central and inner London by December 2016, including the removal of the Aldgate gyratory and the installation of the East-West and North-South Superhighways.

The model assumes that traffic volumes will remain at current levels. The model also includes the impact of the advanced traffic signal management programme which will change signal phasing to more effectively regulate the flow of traffic into and around central London.

Heading eastbound in the busiest single hour of the morning peak, average journey times would increase by 39 seconds, from 11 minutes 21 seconds to 12 minutes. Travelling eastbound in the busiest single hour of the evening peak, average journey times would increase by 17 seconds, from 13 minutes 6 seconds to 13 minutes and 23 seconds.

Travelling westbound from Bow Roundabout to Aldgate, journey times in the morning would increase by just over 7 minutes from 14 minutes 29 seconds to 21 minutes 36 seconds. In the same direction in the evenings, journey times would increase by 3 minutes 16 seconds, from 14 minutes 47 seconds to 18 minutes 3 seconds.

We plan to further reduce journey time delays using a number of other techniques which we successfully used during the Olympic Games. These include:

  • greatly increased enforcement against illegal parking and loading on these routes to keep unplanned disruption to a minimum
  • a freight management and consolidation strategy, which encourages freight operators (on these and other routes) to plan their activity to avoid the busiest times and locations
  • a behaviour change strategy (on these and other routes), which encourages drivers to use alternative forms of transport
  • a travel demand management strategy to provide more comprehensive and specific travel advice to road users, which would help them to make informed journey choices to avoid busy times and busy locations

 

The figures given above do not include the effects of these further techniques. However, experience of pilot schemes suggests they could be of substantial help in further reducing journey time impacts.

 

Buses

Traffic modelling has been undertaken for the bus routes which go through the scheme area to understand the impact of the scheme on bus journeys. The figures include the total effect not just of this scheme - the upgrade of Cycle Superhighway 2 - but also of 20 other traffic schemes to be delivered in central and inner London by December 2016, including the removal of the Aldgate gyratory and the installation of the proposed East-West and North-South Cycle Superhighways.

Twenty journey time impacts have been modelled. Of these, seven journeys would be quicker, by up to one minute. Four journeys would be slower by a minute or less, and seven would be slower by between one and two minutes. Two journeys would be between two and five minutes slower.

  • Routes 25, 205 and 425, which run between Bow Roundabout and Aldgate would experience an increase in journey time of between 1-2 minutes in both the east and westbound directions in the morning, and the westbound direction in the evening. Heading east out of London in the evening, journey times would increase by up to one minute.
  • Route 254 between Cambridge Heath Road and Aldgate westbound would see journey times drop by up to one minute in the morning. In the evening heading westbound, journey times would increase between 2-5 minutes. Eastbound journeys could be up to a minute longer in the morning, but up to a minute quicker in the evening.
  • Route 106 running across the route between Cambridge Heath Road and Sidney Street southbound, journey times would improve by up to one minute in both the morning and evening. Heading north, journey times would increase by up to a minute in the morning and up to 2 minutes in the evening.
  • Route 309 between Globe Road and White Horse Lane heading southbound would see journeys in the morning increasing by between 2-5 minutes, whereas journeys in the evening would improve by up to one minute. Northbound journeys could be up to a minute longer in the morning, but up to a minute quicker in the evening.
  • Route 277 and D6 between Grove Road and Burdett Road would see an improvement in journey times of up to one minute heading north in the morning, but would see an increase of 1-2 minutes both in the morning and evening southbound, as well as northbound in the evening.

 

Where there are negative impacts on journey times for bus routes impacted by the scheme, a programme of work is being developed to save time elsewhere along the affected route by addressing delays and giving priority to buses at certain pinch-points. Bus stop bypasses would be provided for 33 TfL bus stops alongside the cycle track.

 

Explanatory note on accompanying traffic modelling data table

TfL has used traffic modelling techniques to calculate the expected journey time changes on certain routes through the scheme area at the busiest hour in both the morning and evening peak. This data table outlines the expected journey times through three modelled stages;

  • Base model (column A) – current situation on street. Journey times for general traffic and cyclists are taken from TRANSYT models. Journey times for buses are taken from Hyperion data
  • Future base model (column B) – Expected situation for general traffic in December 2016 if the Barclays Cycle Superhighway Route 2 upgrade scheme was not built, but taking account of the impact of all other TfL road schemes delivered by this date. Without the scheme, traffic signal timings in the scheme area would not change, so pedestrian wait times would remain as they are currently
  • Future journey times with scheme (column C) – Expected on-street conditions in December 2016 if the Barclays Cycle Superhighway Route 2 upgrade scheme is built. These journey times take account of the advanced traffic signal management programme, which will change signal phasing to more effectively regulate the flow of traffic at certain locations to keep central London moving

 

The data table includes information for the route for general traffic through the scheme area, the main bus routes which go through the scheme area to represent the impact of the scheme on bus journeys, the cycle route from Bow Roundabout to Aldgate and the pedestrian crossings at six groups of signalised junctions.

Further detailed modelling information is available on request by emailing your requirements and contact details to trafficmodelling@tfl.gov.uk.

 

Complementary Measures

The impacts calculated through the traffic models do not take account of a range of additional complementary measures that would have beneficial impacts on journey times for buses and general traffic.

  • Where there are negative impacts on journey times for bus routes shown in the table, a programme of work is being developed to save time elsewhere along the affected route by addressing delays and giving priority to buses at certain pinch-points
  • Road users can expect more comprehensive and specific travel advice to help them to make informed journey choices to avoid busy times and locations
  • We will continue our work with freight and servicing companies to support them to plan their activity to avoid the busiest times and locations, evaluate quieter technology to enable more deliveries to take place out of hours and investigate the benefits of consolidation centres
  • Through the creation of the new Roads and Transport Policing Command, we will target enforcement at the busiest locations and known hot spots to reduce hold-ups and delays and keep traffic moving

 

Return to the CS2 upgrade consultation homepage.

 

Areas

  • All Areas

Audiences

  • Public
  • Stakeholders
  • Local residents
  • Local businesses
  • Schools
  • London Boroughs
  • Coach Operators
  • Taxi trade
  • Transport for London

Interests

  • Cycling