Cycling and walking improvements between Lea Bridge and Dalston: Phase 2 between Clapton and Lea Bridge

Closes 16 Dec 2019

Opened 17 Oct 2019

Overview

Update 25 November 2019  

We have decided to extend the closing date for comments to Monday 16 December 2019 to give local people and other stakeholders more time to have their say.  

We have also arranged two public drop-in events, where staff involved in the development of our proposals will be available to answer questions. These will be held on the following dates:  

Tuesday 3 December 2019 (12:00 - 19:00) St. James The Great Church,
Lower Clapton Road, London E5 8EG  

Saturday 7 December 2019 (11:00 - 16:00) Beecholme Estate Community Hall, Prout Road, London E5 9NP  

- update ends -

We want your views on our proposals to transform streets in east London linking Lea Bridge and Dalston to make it easier and safer for people to cycle and walk. Neighbourhoods would be connected by a new Cycleway, with improvements in each area also proposed for people walking.

The proposals are an important part of the Mayor of London's Transport Strategy. The proposals are guided by the Mayor of London's Healthy Streets Approach, which aims to encourage walking, cycling and public transport use and make London greener, healthier and more pleasant. The proposals are also an important part of the Mayor of London's Walking and Cycling Action Plans. These complementary plans set out how we and London boroughs will work to increase the number of people walking and cycling, helping to address poor air quality and congestion, while improving infrastructure to make walking and cycling even easier, safer and more accessible for everyone.

These proposals would provide benefits for all street users and communities in these areas, making it easier to cross busy roads, removing through traffic on some residential roads and offering segregated space for people to cycle. They would form part of London’s emerging cycling network connecting with CS1 in Dalston, and the Lea Bridge Road walking and cycling improvements in Waltham Forest.

We are consulting in two phases. This consultation is for the second phase between Clapton and Lea Bridge. It follows on from the consultation for the first phase between Dalston and Clapton which opened on 17 July and closed on 9 September 2019.

The route between Clapton and Lea Bridge follows Lea Bridge Road and Lea Bridge Roundabout, connecting to Powell Road via Kenninghall Road where it continues on quieter back streets to Dalston. Our proposals include:

  • A new cycle route that people cycling can use to get around
  • New and upgraded signalised junctions with facilities for people walking and cycling
  • A new tree-lined boulevard for people cycling and walking within Millfields Park, with new trees, lighting and improved landscaping
  • Changing entry to and exit from some roads along the route
  • Improvements to traffic calming on Powell Road
  • Changes to some parking and loading provision
  • Improvements to the public realm

Here is a map of the route and the main proposals. Click here to open it as an A3 size (PDF 397KB)

Your browser does not support inline PDF viewing.Please download the PDF.

Details of the proposals on each section of the route can be found below. Click here to open the detailed drawings as one pack (PDF 3MB)

Please share this consultation with your neighbours, community, friends, colleagues, staff etc so we get as many views as we can.

Below is a computer generated image of what the Cycleway could look like at Lea Bridge Roundabout.

CGI of what the Cycleway could look like at Lea Bridge Roundabout

Below is a computer generated image of what the Cycleway could look like at Lea Bridge Road.

CGI of what the Cycleway could look like at Lea Bridge Road

If you would like to go straight to a particular topic please use the links below. 

What are Cycleways?

What we are proposing as the main changes to the street layout

How these proposals would affect journey times

Traffic reassignment

Environmental impacts

Healthy Streets

Equalities

Why we are consulting

Public exhibitions

Have your say

What are Cycleways?

Cycleways are new high-quality cycle routes that people cycling can use to get around. They link communities, businesses and destinations across London. Each new Cycleway will have its own number with on-street signs and road markings, making them easy to use. As we rethink street space to benefit people cycling we are also prioritising changes that help people to move around on foot.

This proposed new Cycleway was identified in our Strategic Cycling Analysis as a key area for existing and potential cycling. This proposed new Cycleway also provides an opportunity to improve the street network by encouraging walking and cycling, increasing connectivity to key attractions, new developments, transport hubs and the wider Cycleways network.

The proposals

We want to hear from local people and all Londoners on our proposals, so we can design them to best meet people’s needs and expectations to encourage more people to cycle, walk and use public transport.

Our policy objectives for this scheme are to help deliver Vision Zero, the Walking and Cycling Action Plans and improve air quality. We have developed these proposals using experience from cycling infrastructure, healthy streets and public realm schemes. We have worked with local stakeholders and communities in the area seeking initial feedback on our ideas and to understand how these changes will affect local streets and people.

What we are proposing as the main changes to the street layout

We are proposing a number of features along the route to make it safer and more pleasant for people who cycle and walk, whilst keeping buses running on time. These include some significant changes to the street layout as explained below. See the map above for where these are proposed:

  • New segregated cycle tracks on Kenninghall Road, Lea Bridge Roundabout and Lea Bridge Road
  • A new 4 metre wide path for walking and cycling in Millfields Park running parallel to Lea Bridge Road for eastbound cyclists. (A new path in Millfields Park would be subject to a successful application to the Planning Inspectorate, which would be submitted after this public consultation).
  • A new signal controlled junction with a crossing for people walking and people cycling at the junction of Powell Road and Kenninghall Road
  • Powell Road to become no entry or exit except for people cycling at the junction with Kenninghall Road, with dedicated signals for people cycling exiting Powell Road
  • Banned turning movements at the junction of Lea Bridge Road and Chatsworth Road to reduce the risk of collisions (between motor vehicles and people walking or cycling) and to minimise delays to buses
  • Changes to bus stops and bus lanes along the route including the introduction of three Bus Stop Bypasses and the relocation of two bus stops
  • The westbound bus lane on Lea Bridge Road will be extended through Lea Bridge roundabout to Lower Clapton Road
  • The eastbound bus lane on Lea Bridge Road will be changed to a westbound bus lane at the same location
  • Changes to some parking provision on Kenninghall Road and Powell Road

Click here to see the relevant maps and details for our proposed cycling and walking improvements between Lea Bridge and Powell Road.

How these proposals would affect journey times

Transforming street layouts is not without impacts, and there are difficult choices to be made in determining the layout for streets. For example, these changes could mean that some journeys through this area may take longer.

We have carried-out detailed traffic modelling to understand how our proposals might affect journey times for people driving, using buses, cycling and walking. To do this we assessed how London's roads would operate in 2021, considering population growth, committed developments and other road improvements. We then tested how London's roads would operate in 2021 with the changes proposed as part of this scheme. This allows us to isolate the predicted impacts of this proposed scheme from other changes which are not part of this consultation.

Traffic modelling has been carried-out to study the traffic impacts of the scheme at the busiest times of the day, and results are presented for both the morning and evening peak hours. We would actively monitor and manage the road network following implementation to ensure impacts were balanced.

Despite the sophistication of our traffic and reassignment models, all traffic modelling is only ever indicative; it is intended to give an idea of where the impacts of changes in journeys are most likely to be felt. It assumes that drivers have perfect knowledge of the network and will always choose the quickest route available.

Overview

Overall, buses in the area are expected to experience a combination of small delays and small improvements to journey times as a result of the proposals.

Buses travelling westbound along the Cycleway to Lower Clapton Road via Lea Bridge Roundabout (48, 55 & 56) are expected to experience a delay of one to two minutes due to changes to the layout and signal operation of the roundabout.

Buses travelling in both directions along the Lower Clapton Road and Upper Clapton Road corridor (106, 253, 254) are expected to experience small increases in journey times (less than one minute) in the morning peak and small decreases in journey times in the afternoon peak (less than one minute).

Bus route 308 which follows Chatsworth Road and Lea Bridge Road is expected to experience a decrease in journey times of up to three minutes in the morning peak and an increase of up to two minutes in the afternoon peak.

Opportunities outside of the scheme area are being explored to help improve journey times where possible.

Traffic reassignment

With the proposed banned left turn at the Chatsworth Road junction there is expected to be a small increase in the number of vehicles turning left from Lea Bridge Road to Lower Clapton Road at Lea Bridge Roundabout in the morning peak.

There is expected to be a decrease in the traffic using Chatsworth Road but traffic is expected to increase on Lea Bridge Road eastbound between the roundabout and Chatsworth Road because of the banned right turn from Chatsworth Road to Lea Bridge Road.

In the afternoon peak, a small amount of traffic is expected to divert from Kenninghall Road to Brooke Road.

Potential impacts to AM peak traffic

The modelling predicts a small decrease in journey time of up to one minute for eastbound traffic between Kenninghall Road and Lea Bridge. Westbound traffic is expected to experience an increase in journey time of one to two minutes due to increased queueing on Lea Bridge Road. This is caused by the extended bus lane reducing the space available for general traffic at the western end of Lea Bridge Road.

Northbound traffic travelling between Lower Clapton Road and Upper Clapton Road is expected to experience a small increase in journey time of up to one minute. Southbound traffic is expected to experience a delay of up to three minutes due to the extended bus lane at Lea Bridge roundabout. 

Potential impacts to PM peak traffic

The modelling predicts a small increase in journey time of up to one minute for eastbound traffic between Kenninghall Road and Lea Bridge. Westbound traffic is expected to experience a similar increase to the AM peak.

Between Lower Clapton Road and Upper Clapton Road, traffic is expected to experience a small decrease in journey times of up to one minute in both directions.

Information on predicted changes to journey times for people driving, walking, cycling and using buses is here (PDF 13KB).

If you have any questions or clarifications with regards to our traffic modelling please email trafficmodelling@tfl.gov.uk for more information.

Environmental impacts

To make long-term improvements in London’s air quality we need to make real changes to how London operates now. A number of schemes to improve London's air quality are planned including taking steps to reduce air pollution from our bus fleet, reducing emissions from taxis and private hire vehicles, setting up five ‘Low Emission Neighbourhoods’ and expanding the electric vehicle charging network, making it simpler to use. We are investing to make London’s streets healthy, safe and attractive places to walk and cycle. Enabling more journeys to be made on foot or by bike can help reduce private vehicle use and associated emissions.

In developing these proposals we have aimed to:

  • Reduce the dominance of traffic in the area
  • Improve the environment for pedestrians and cyclists to encourage more people to walk and cycle
  • Maintain bus journey times to encourage people to use public transport
  • Integrate the new cycle route with transport interchanges to help people who need to interchange with buses, tubes and trains to continue their journeys

Air pollution is one of the most significant challenges facing London, affecting the health of all Londoners. As part of the plans for new measures to tackle London’s current poor air quality we introduced the London Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ) on 8 April 2019. In 2021 this will be expanded to include the inner London area bounded by the North and South Circular roads.

A number of other schemes to improve London's air quality are planned including taking steps to reduce air pollution from our bus fleet, reducing emissions from taxis and private hire vehicles, setting up five ‘Low Emission Neighbourhoods’ and expanding the electric vehicle charging network, making it simpler to use.

We are investing to make London’s streets healthy, safe and attractive places to walk and cycle. Enabling more journeys to be made on foot or by bike can help reduce private vehicle use and associated emissions. See here for more information on how we are creating Healthy Streets.

Healthy Streets

In our commitment to deliver the Healthy Streets approach we are creating a vibrant, successful city where the streets are welcoming to all, and everyone can live active, healthy lives. These proposals have been assessed against the ten Healthy Streets Indicators. To see the results of this assessment click here (PDF 235KB).

The Healthy Streets Check for Designers is a spreadsheet tool to enable designers to assess a street layout and use against the 10 Healthy Streets Indicators. The layout of the street is assessed against thirty one quantitative metrics to produce an overall Healthy Streets Check score out of 100.  This is a very conservative tool that assesses each metric at its weakest point. Twenty one metrics are scored between 1 and 3. Ten of the metrics are scored between zero and three. These are high priority metrics because they can have a significant impact on how the street feels to walk, cycle, use public transport or spend time on. 

If you would like to know more about the Healthy Streets Check for Designers click here. If you have any questions about our Healthy Streets Approach please write to us at consultations@tfl.gov.uk.

Equalities

We are subject to the general public sector equality duty set out in section 149 of the Equality Act 2010 which requires us to have due regard to the need to eliminate discrimination, advance equality of opportunity and foster good relations by reference to people with protected characteristics. The protected characteristics are: age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation. As part of our decision-making process on proposals for new schemes we have due regard to any impacts on those with protected characteristics and the need to ensure their interests are taken into account.

In developing these proposals we closely considered the needs of all users throughout the design process. As this scheme is a significant infrastructure project we:

  • Have completed an Equality Impact Assessment (EqIA) to review potential impacts
  • Will carry out public consultations, including targeted engagement with specific user groups
  • Will continue to ensure we comply with established guidance – such as the Design Manual for Roads and Bridges – which includes detailed requirements

Some negative impacts have been identified where we are proposing to remove or relocate bus stops, or to install bus stop bypasses and where pedestrians must cross the cycle track to get between the pavement and the bus stop. All bus stop bypasses would include zebra crossings with tactile paving and be raised to footway level to create a flush surface. Our research has found that bus stop bypasses are safe for all road users, including those with protected characteristics. Click here for more information on bus stop bypasses.

The EqIA will be kept under review and updated to reflect any material changes to the proposals.

Click here for our Equality Impact Assessment (PDF 763KB).

Why we are consulting

The proposed improvements are designed to help us meet the target set-out in the Mayor of London's Transport Strategy of changing the way people choose to travel, so that 80 per cent of all London trips are made by foot, bicycle or public transport by 2041, up from 64 per cent today. Changing how space is allocated to different street users throughout London is an important way of helping more people travel sustainably.

Improving safety for people who want to walk or cycle

The areas between Lea Bridge and Dalston tend to be residential with vibrant high streets and green space. However, some roads through these neighbourhoods are currently dominated by motor traffic and can be intimidating and unpleasant places for people to walk and cycle. These proposals would provide a safer and more pleasant environment and would improve connections between residential areas and town centres. They would contribute towards the Mayor of London’s Vision Zero ambition to eradicate deaths and serious injuries from our streets by 2041.

By giving people space and time to cycle in the area more easily and safely, and by providing improved crossing facilities for people walking, we can encourage more people to use these healthy and sustainable forms of transport while keeping other traffic moving. These improvements would help to make these streets more welcoming for people walking, cycling and using public transport so people and the community as a whole can benefit.

Improving London’s air

London's air is toxic leading to 9,000 premature deaths a year and road transport contributes the majority of air pollution in the city. Reducing the number of trips by private vehicles and encouraging people to walk, cycle and use public transport would significantly improve our air.

Part of London’s growing cycle network  

The new cycle facilities aim to encourage people who would like to cycle, but currently feel unable to do so.

Two-thirds of car trips could be walked or cycled in under 20 minutes. To encourage people to get out of their cars we need to tackle the barriers many people currently face, whether that’s feeling unsafe or that it’s easier to use their car. Building new Cycleways can help people cycle more, alongside providing training.

We know building more walking and cycling infrastructure can improve town centres and make them into places where people want to spend more time.  We also know walking and cycling boost employees’ productivity, giving another boost to the local economy.

There is great potential for more cycling in inner and outer London. Building new Cycleways will help encourage more local cycle journeys, giving Londoners more options for getting to work, education, shopping, or enjoying what the city has to offer.

Improving the health of Londoners

We want to make it easier for people to use sustainable travel and lead active lifestyles. We also want to make the streets as part of the scheme healthier, safer and more welcoming places for everyone. The proposals form part of the Mayor of London’s plan for Healthy Streets.

Currently, only 34 per cent of Londoners take 20 minutes of physical activity on any given day. If people walked or cycled for just 20 minutes each day it would prevent 1 in 6 early deaths, saving the NHS around £1.6bn per year. It would also help other health issues, such as diabetes, stroke, depression and dementia.

The proposed improvements would help to encourage people to use active forms of transport, which could achieve significant health benefits. The proposals aim to encourage people who would like to cycle and walk, but currently feel unable to do so.

When would we build the scheme?

Subject to the outcome of this consultation, construction could start as early as this winter.

Working closely with Hackney Council in delivering the proposals we would carefully plan construction to minimise disruption to those who live, work and travel in the area. As part of this planning we would coordinate closely with other construction works in the area, and consider alternative ways of working including advance works, weekends and evenings.

We would keep residents, businesses and community groups informed so they can plan ahead, reducing any impact on their journeys, lives and businesses.

Have your say

Public exhibitions

We will be holding two public drop-in sessions where you can view the proposals, speak to members of the project team and ask questions.

Tuesday 3 December 2019 (12:00 - 19:00) St. James The Great Church,
Lower Clapton Road, London E5 8EG  

Saturday 7 December 2019 (11:00 - 16:00) Beecholme Estate Community Hall, Prout Road, London E5 9NP  

At these we will explain how previous feedback has helped shape our design.

Other proposed new Cycleways

Over the next few months we plan to consult on other Cycleways across London with improvements for people walking, see tfl.gov.uk/new-cycle-routes.

If you would like to be kept informed of these consultations please tell us at newcycleroutes@tfl.gov.uk.

We would like to know what you think about our proposals. Please tell us by Monday 16 December 2019 by completing our survey below.

Alternatively, you can:

*Service and network charges apply. Visit tfl.gov.uk/terms for details.

You can also request paper copies of all the consultation materials and a response form, copies in Braille, large text or another language by emailing consultations@tfl.gov.uk or writing to FREEPOST TFL CONSULTATIONS (CYCLEWAY).

If you would like information in another language or format please let us know as soon as possible.

Next Steps

Following the completion of the consultation we will assess all comments received and use this feedback to inform any necessary design changes. We plan to publish the consultation report and the response to issues raised report later this year.

Have your say

Areas

  • Hackney

Audiences

  • Anyone from any background

Interests

  • Buses
  • Cycling
  • Junction Improvements
  • Roads
  • Walking
  • Urban realm improvements
  • Air Quality