Have your say on options for new river crossings in east London

Closed 18 Sep 2014

Opened 7 Jul 2014

Results Updated 15 Apr 2016

The consultation in respect of additional river crossings ran from 7 Jul 2014 to 18 September 2014, receiving almost 7,500 responses. The analysis we have undertaken has shown that over 90 per cent of respondents expressed support for new crossings. We have released our Consultation Report and a document responding to the issues raised

From the responses received, the majority of feedback supported the introduction of new fixed link crossings, rather than the introduction of new ferry crossings.

Having considered all of the issues raised in the consultation, we will now continue to develop the concepts of new bridges at Gallions Reach and Belvedere. We will also consider whether tunnels would be more suitable by releasing greater land for development than would be possible with a bridge.

Over the next few months extensive work will take place to develop proposals for two new fixed link crossings at Gallions Reach and Belvedere.  This work will:

  • Deliver a greater understanding of likely impacts new river crossings could have on traffic flow and the environment;
  • Set out opportunities to improve cross-river links for pedestrians, cyclists and public transport passengers;
  • Give consideration to any additional traffic management requirements to ensure the crossings operate successfully and sustainably;
  • Provide a clear business case for new river crossings, including user charging to manage demand and fund the construction and operation;
  • Explore how best to apply for powers needed to build and operate the new crossings.
     

New crossings at Gallions Reach and Belvedere would transform the connectivity of outer east London, open up major sites for development and help to support the delivery of jobs and homes across a wide area.  Once the proposals for these two crossings have been developed further, we will undertake a more detailed consultation, planned to commence in the autumn 2015. 

We will put our consideration of proposals for a new ferry at Woolwich and a ferry at Gallions Reach on hold, pending the outcome of this work.

Overview

Update - December 2015

Click here to go to the latest consultation on river crossings

Following a 2014 consultation on east London river crossing options, the Mayor asked Transport for London (TfL) to progress options for new bridges or tunnels at both Gallions Reach and Belvedere. Taking account of the responses received, over the last twelve months we have been undertaking various pieces of work on:

  • The likely impacts of these crossings, including impact on traffic flows
  • The public transport network and options for public transport provision on each of the crossings
  • Environmental considerations and impacts
  • The economic benefits of new crossings
     

This consultation will help to progress the project and ensure our decisions take account of the views of the public and stakeholders.

We would like to know whether you support the crossings, how you think you would use them and the destinations you would like to be able to get to by improved public transport connections.

We appreciate your time in reading about our project and providing us with your feedback.

Update ends


 

Update: March 2015

The consultation in respect of additional river crossings ran from 7 Jul 2014 to 18 September 2014, receiving almost 7,500 responses. The analysis we have undertaken has shown that over 90 per cent of respondents expressed support for new crossings. We have released our Consultation Report and a document responding to the issues raised

From the responses received, the majority of feedback supported the introduction of new fixed link crossings, rather than the introduction of new ferry crossings.

Having considered all of the issues raised in the consultation, we will now continue to develop the concepts of new bridges at Gallions Reach and Belvedere. We will also consider whether tunnels would be more suitable by releasing greater land for development than would be possible with a bridge.

Over the next few months extensive work will take place to develop proposals for two new fixed link crossings at Gallions Reach and Belvedere.  This work will:

  • Deliver a greater understanding of likely impacts new river crossings could have on traffic flow and the environment;
  • Set out opportunities to improve cross-river links for pedestrians, cyclists and public transport passengers;
  • Give consideration to any additional traffic management requirements to ensure the crossings operate successfully and sustainably;
  • Provide a clear business case for new river crossings, including user charging to manage demand and fund the construction and operation;
  • Explore how best to apply for powers needed to build and operate the new crossings.
     

New crossings at Gallions Reach and Belvedere would transform the connectivity of outer east London, open up major sites for development and help to support the delivery of jobs and homes across a wide area.  Once the proposals for these two crossings have been developed further, we will undertake a more detailed consultation, planned to commence in the autumn 2015. 

We will put our consideration of proposals for a new ferry at Woolwich and a ferry at Gallions Reach on hold, pending the outcome of this work.
 

Update: October 2014

We received almost 7,500 responses to this consultation from across London.  The analysis we have undertaken to date highlights how strongly both residents and businesses feel about this issue and how much support there is for additional crossings.  Over 98 per cent of respondents expressed support for new crossings with less than two per cent of respondents commenting that there was no need for any new river crossings to be built. 

Whilst there were different views on the specific location and timescales for progressing individual crossings, it was very clear that there is widespread support for a package of new river crossings.  Given the scale of growth planned for east London and the projected population increase, there is significant public support to proceed further with the Silvertown Tunnel proposal and to consider plans for new crossings at both Gallions Reach and Belvedere.  We will publish a report summarising and responding to the issues raised during the recent consultation by the end of November.

TfL is now progressing further work on options for new river crossings at Gallions Reach and Belvedere.  These new crossings would transform the connectivity of outer east London, open up major sites for development and help to support the delivery of jobs and homes across a wide area.  Once the proposals for these two crossings have been developed further, we will undertake a more detailed consultation, planned to commence in September 2015. 

We have also published a paper summarising our analysis of the consultation outcome to date

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For our last consultation on the River Crossings programme, please click here

TfL’s River Crossings programme seeks to make it easier to cross the Thames by road between east and south-east London.

We have so far sought your views on a range of potential new river crossings. Our most recent consultation, which ran between October 2012 and February 2013, proposed a number of options. These included the Silvertown Tunnel, to relieve congestion and improve reliability at Blackwall Tunnel and beyond, as well as options for a new crossing further to the east.

A majority of respondents supported the new crossings, and we received useful feedback to help us develop our proposals.

We consider that east London will need a number of new road-based river crossings between now and 2050. This is in addition to the Silvertown Tunnel, which will provide extra capacity and resilience at Blackwall Tunnel, and the new Lower Thames Crossing, which will provide additional capacity at the Dartford Crossings. Locations that we have assessed as being suitable for new river crossings are Woolwich, Gallions Reach and Belvedere.

Over the last few months we have continued to consider the issues raised during our last consultation and have considered ideas for new river crossings, particularly in the context of our plans for 2050.

We will be undertaking separate consultations on the proposed Silvertown Tunnel from later this year. We would now like to know your views on a revised set of options for new river crossings further to the east.

Your feedback to this consultation will help us determine our next steps. The closing date for comments is 18 September 2014.

Why do we need more river crossings?

The river forms a barrier between north and south London. People and goods need to cross it every day for both social and economic purposes to make the city work.

Over the last 20 years we have invested a great deal in cross-river public transport capacity, including through the extension of the Jubilee line, DLR network, improvements to the East London Line and introduction of the Emirates Air Line. The first Crossrail trains will enter service in late 2018.

Nevertheless, there will always be a need for some journeys to be made by road, including by bus or for freight and provision for road transport across the Thames has remained largely unchanged over this time.

The map below shows the pedestrian, cycle and rail river crossings across the eastern Thames, including existing crossings and those that are under development or have been proposed.

For a larger version of this map click here

Between Rotherhithe and Dartford, residents and businesses in east London currently rely on two cross-river highway links: the Blackwall Tunnel and the Woolwich Ferry. The lack of capacity and cross-river connections cause congestion and other problems throughout the area.

TfL’s River Crossings programme will help to resolve the problems that a lack of road crossings in east London causes.

The need for new crossings to support London’s economy and manage growth

We recently asked businesses in east and south-east London about their experiences crossing the river. Many businesses reported considerable difficulties and the overwhelming majority felt that a new crossing would benefit east London’s economy. Around half believed that they would be likely to employ more staff if new river crossings were built in east London.

The 2011 Census showed that London’s population is growing more quickly than had been estimated. The Capital’s population is now forecast to grow to around 10m people by 2031, and then grow by a further 1.5m people by 2050. Much of this growth is expected to take place in east London.

With a growing population, demand to cross the river will grow and the problems currently experienced by people and businesses will only get worse.

The ageing Woolwich Ferry

We are required by statute to operate a ferry crossing at Woolwich. However, the current ferry service at Woolwich has been in operation since the mid 1960s and is nearing the end of its practical working life. It is time to consider the long-term future of the Woolwich Ferry. If the ferry were to close without new river crossings in place, journeys by road over the Thames would be even more difficult.

Reliance on Blackwall

The Blackwall Tunnel is used by many thousands of vehicles each day. During peak periods the amount of traffic trying to use the tunnel far exceeds its capacity, and there is regular congestion throughout the area as a result. Height restrictions prevent many tall vehicles from using it, frequently leading to closures. We have proposed building the Silvertown Tunnel to provide the extra highway capacity and resilience that is needed. New crossings further to the east would also help provide additional resilience. The Silvertown Tunnel will be subject to separate consultations from later this autumn.

Improvements at Dartford

When there is an incident or significant congestion at Dartford, some traffic diverts into London via the A2 and A13 to use the Blackwall Tunnel.

The Department for Transport (DfT) plans to introduce free-flow charging at Dartford, which will help by easing congestion. The DfT is also considering options for a new ‘Lower Thames Crossing’, to further relieve congestion at Dartford.

These planned improvements will reduce the need for long-distance traffic to use London’s roads, but there is still a clear need for additional river crossings for east London.

Managing demand for the new crossings

Vehicles would be charged to use the new crossings. The charge would dissuade some people from using the new crossings - they might instead use public transport. In this way, the charge would help keep demand for the new crossings within manageable limits, which would in turn help to ensure efficient journeys for cross-river trips that could not be made by public transport.

We envisage that peak period charges would be comparable to those at the Dartford Crossing, although no decisions have yet been made. There would be scope for discounts and exemptions although these are yet to be considered in detail. Detailed proposals for user charging would be the subject of a subsequent consultation.

Net revenues from the charge would help to pay for the new river crossings.

The options

We have assessed a wide range of options, including the ideas for new crossings that were suggested by respondents to our last consultation.

We have identified four options for new river crossings that we believe will provide significant benefits for people and businesses in east London.  These are:

  1. A new modern ferry at Woolwich
  2. A ferry service at Gallions Reach
  3. A bridge at Gallions Reach
  4. A bridge at Belvedere

 

The map below shows the location of each new crossing option.

For a larger version of this map click here

The table below summarises the main effects of the new crossing options.

For a larger version of this table click here

The information was taken from a series of technical reports which are available in the 'Want to know more?' section at the bottom of this page. The indicative cost ranges above reflect the estimated costs of construction and permanent land purchases and include an allowance for risk and inflation. The costs of any complementary measures and land required temporarily for construction are not included.

Option 1 – a new modern ferry at Woolwich

A new ferry to replace the existing service at Woolwich.

For a larger version of Option 1 click here

Overview – a new modern ferry at Woolwich

A replacement ferry service at Woolwich, with new vessels and terminals, would allow us to continue to operate a crossing here, although there would be a charge to use the replacement service.

The existing vessels, which are over 50 years old, would be replaced with new, more environmentally-friendly vessels. The new vessels would be approximately 30 per cent bigger than those currently in operation. In addition, the land-side infrastructure could be simplified and improved.

Pedestrians, cyclists, cars and lorries could all continue to use the ferry. A crossing would take up to 12 minutes on average, including boarding and alighting time, although queuing times would vary. In cases of extreme weather, such as thick fog, the service might have to be temporarily suspended. The ferry would probably operate similar days and hours as now.

Timescales

TfL owns the land that the replacement ferry infrastructure would use, so a new ferry service could be operational here by the early 2020s, including a period of construction of around three years. Depending on the exact positioning of the new infrastructure, we might need to close the service for up to two and a half years while we construct the replacement, which would restrict crossing options for businesses and residents. All timings are indicative.

Costs – a new modern ferry at Woolwich

It would cost from £100m-£200m to build the new ferry and around £3.5m each year to operate and maintain it.

Although a new ferry at Woolwich would involve the lowest up-front costs there would be significant ongoing costs to maintain and operate the vessels. Taking these into account, this option could cost more than the bridge-based options in the long run.

Traffic impacts

We think it is unlikely that a new ferry crossing at Woolwich would significantly alter traffic patterns in east London, since Woolwich is already an established crossing point.

A new ferry might help to lessen the impact of some of the current issues associated with operating a ferry crossing at Woolwich. For example, on the south side of the river, the ferry pier is located close to the road network. If the ferry is delayed, vehicles can quickly block back from the waiting area, disrupting traffic flow on the A205 and A206.

A new ferry service at Woolwich would offer more capacity and be more reliable, potentially helping to reduce the number of occasions when traffic must wait to board the ferry. There might also be modest reductions in average journey times, although it is unlikely that local traffic impacts currently experienced could be completely resolved while a ferry crossing is located at Woolwich.

Impacts on the environment – a new modern ferry at Woolwich

We would not expect traffic noise or other emissions to change significantly.

We would use modern, more fuel efficient and environmentally friendly vessels to operate a replacement ferry service at Woolwich.

Building new ferry infrastructure at Woolwich could lead to some disturbance of natural habitats. We would carefully plan the construction of the new infrastructure to minimise this as far as practicable, and would consider creating alternative habitats if necessary. We would ensure that any contaminated soil uncovered during construction was safely isolated, and, if necessary, disposed of.

Economic benefits

It is unlikely that a new ferry would significantly reduce cross-river journey times and it would be unlikely to have a significant economic impact.

Detailed impacts

We have published a number of technical reports which describe the expected impacts in detail. For further details, please see the section ‘Want to know more?’

Option 2 – a ferry service at Gallions Reach

A ferry crossing linking Thamesmead and Beckton.

 

For a larger version of Option 2 click here

Overview – a ferry service at Gallions Reach

A new ferry service at Gallions Reach would provide a link between roads in Thamesmead on the south side and Beckton on the north side.

Pedestrians, cyclists, cars and lorries could all use the ferry, which could carry around twice as many passengers and vehicles as the existing service at Woolwich.

Boarding, alighting and crossing could take up to around 18 minutes in total, although queuing time would vary. In cases of extreme weather, such as thick fog, the service might have to be temporarily suspended.

The ferry would likely operate similar hours as the current Woolwich Ferry service.

New bus links would serve the ferry terminals on either side of the river, to allow foot passengers to easily interchange and continue their journey.

Timescales

The land required to build the new ferry infrastructure is already safeguarded, which means a new ferry service could be operational here by the early 2020s, including a period of about three years for construction. All timescales are indicative.

We would continue to operate the Woolwich Ferry while the new ferry is being built, but would plan to close it when the new ferry was opened.

New link roads – a ferry service at Gallions Reach

We would build new roads to link the ferry terminals to the existing road network. On the north side of the river, the approach road from the ferry would connect to the Royal Docks Road. On the south side, the approach road from the ferry would connect to the A2016 at Western Way.

Costs

It would cost from £150m-£250m to build the new ferry and around £3.5m each year to operate and maintain it.

Although a new ferry at Gallions Reach would involve lower up-front costs there would be significant ongoing costs to maintain and operate the vessels. Taking these into account, this option could cost more than the bridge-based options in the long run.

Traffic impacts

Journey times between Thamesmead and Beckton would be reduced, compared to a journey between these places via the Woolwich ferry. The closure of the Woolwich ferry would mean that there would no longer be a direct highway link between Woolwich and North Woolwich.

A new ferry crossing at Gallions Reach would carry a maximum flow of around 350 to 400 vehicles per hour in one direction at the busiest time. This would result in localised changes in traffic patterns. It is likely that local traffic would make up a large proportion of the users of the new ferry, particularly if the proposed new Silvertown Tunnel is constructed.

The map below shows the main routes which would experience increases or decreases in traffic during the morning peak period. Purple lines show where traffic could reduce and orange lines show where traffic could increase. Roads not highlighted would not be likely to see significant change.

During the morning peak the ferry would lead to increased traffic on the approach to the new crossing, particularly the A2016 Eastern Way and in the Thamesmead area, but there would be corresponding reductions in traffic in Woolwich. There would also be small increases in traffic on the A406 north Circular Road. There might also be some traffic impacts on other roads. Impacts in other areas are described in supporting reports.

These changes do not take into account the complementary traffic management measures we would implement if this option was adopted, such as reviewing traffic light timings. Further consultation would be undertaken in relation to these. 

Impacts on the environment – a ferry service at Gallions Reach

Expected changes in traffic patterns would lead to changes in traffic noise and airborne vehicle emissions. There would be small reductions in areas where traffic falls, while there could be small increases in areas where traffic rises or where new roads would be constructed. While further work is necessary to confirm impacts on smaller local roads, our initial analysis suggests that the introduction of a new ferry would not lead to a noticeable change in vehicle emissions. It is also unlikely that most of the surrounding area would experience any increase in noise, though some roads would experience slight increases.

We would use modern, more fuel efficient and environmental friendly vessels to operate a new ferry service at Gallions Reach. A new ferry service would be more energy-efficient than the one  currently in operation at Woolwich.

Building new ferry infrastructure at Gallions Reach could lead to some disturbance of natural habitats. We would carefully plan construction to minimise this as far as practicable, and would consider creating alternative habitats if necessary. We would ensure that any contaminated soil uncovered during construction was safely isolated, and, if necessary, disposed of.

Economic benefits – a ferry service at Gallions Reach

A new ferry at Gallions Reach would improve access and opportunities for businesses and residents in outer east London. For example, by reducing travel time to centres of employment and businesses across the river, it could bring over 20,000 more businesses and over 300,000 more jobs within an average 37 minute commute from Thamesmead.

The closure of the Woolwich ferry would reduce connectivity in the Woolwich and North Woolwich areas.

A new ferry could also support the creation of extra homes in Thamesmead and Beckton.

Detailed impacts

We have published a number of technical reports which describe the expected impacts in detail. For further details, please see the section ‘Want to know more?’

Option 3 - a bridge at Gallions Reach

A new road bridge between Thamesmead and Beckton.

 

For a larger version of Option 3 click here

Overview – a bridge at Gallions Reach

A bridge at Gallions Reach would provide a new road link across the river, connecting the highway in Thamesmead on the south side and Beckton on the north side.

The bridge would carry two lanes in each direction: one for general traffic, and one for buses and heavy goods vehicles. The main bridge structure would be about 1,500 metres long.

The bridge would be open to all road users, including cyclists and pedestrians. It would also open up opportunities for new cross-river public transport links.

As with any other public highway, the bridge would be open 24 hours a day under normal conditions.

Timescales

The land required to build a new bridge at Gallions Reach is safeguarded, which means it could be built and operational by 2022-2025, including a period of around four years for construction. All timings are indicative.

We would continue to operate the Woolwich ferry while the new bridge was being built, but would plan to close it when the new bridge was opened.

New link roads - a bridge at Gallions Reach

We would build new roads to link the bridge to the existing road network. On the north side of the river, the bridge would connect to the Royal Docks Road. On the south side, the bridge would connect to the A2016 at Western Way.

Costs

It would cost from £350m-£600m to build the new bridge and around £0.5m each year to operate and maintain the crossing.

These relatively high up-front costs but low ongoing operational and maintenance costs mean that in the long-run a new bridge here could cost less than the ferry-based options.

Traffic impacts

Journey times across the river would be reduced significantly compared with existing crossing options. The closure of the Woolwich ferry would mean that journeys between Woolwich and North Woolwich would take longer.

A new bridge at Gallions Reach would carry a maximum flow of around 1,350 to 1,600 vehicles per hour in one direction at the busiest time. This would result in changes in traffic volumes and origins and destinations across large parts of east and south-east London. It is likely however that local traffic would make up a large proportion of the users of the new bridge, particularly if the proposed new Silvertown Tunnel is constructed.

The map below shows the main routes which would experience increases or decreases in traffic during the morning peak period. Purple lines show where traffic could reduce and orange lines show where traffic could increase. Roads not highlighted would not be likely to see significant change.

For a larger version of this map click here

The new bridge would provide a more direct route for those who currently have to travel via the Blackwall or Dartford crossings. During the morning peak, as some vehicles divert from these crossings,traffic on the A2, A13 and M25 would reduce. The closure of the Woolwich Ferry would mean that traffic in Woolwich and the Royal Docks would also reduce. Traffic would increase on the A406 and A2016. There might also be some traffic impacts on local roads. Impacts in other periods are described in supporting reports.

We do not expect that a significant amount of traffic would divert away from the existing Dartford crossings, or the proposed Lower Thames Crossing, to take advantage of the new bridge.

These changes do not take into account the complementary traffic management measures we would implement if this option was adopted, such as reviewing traffic light timings. Further consultation would be undertaken in relation to these. 

Impacts on the environment – a bridge at Gallions Reach

Expected changes in traffic patterns would lead to changes in traffic noise and airborne vehicle emissions. There would be small reductions in areas where traffic falls, while there could be small increases in areas where traffic rises or where new roads would be constructed. 

While further work is necessary to confirm impacts on smaller local roads, our initial analysis suggests that the introduction of a new bridge would not lead to a noticeable change in vehicle emissions.

It is also unlikely that most of the surrounding area would experience any increase in noise, though some roads would experience slight increases. The only major noise increase would be localised and confined to the major roads leading to the crossing. We would carefully consider mitigation measures to address any localised impacts.

Building a bridge at Gallions Reach could lead to some disturbance of natural habitats. We would carefully plan construction to minimise this as far as practicable, and would consider creating alternative habitats if necessary. We would ensure that any contaminated soil uncovered during construction was safely isolated, and, if necessary, disposed of.

Economic benefits – a bridge at Gallions Reach

A new bridge at Gallions Reach would significantly improve access and opportunities for businesses and residents in east London.

For example, by reducing travel time to centres of employment and business across the river, it could bring over 100,000 more businesses and over 800,000 more jobs within an average 37 minute commute from Thamesmead. The closure of the Woolwich ferry would reduce connectivity in the Woolwich and North Woolwich areas.

A new bridge could also support the creation of new homes in Thamesmead, Beckton and beyond.

Detailed impacts

We have published a number of technical reports which describe the expected impacts in detail. For further details, please see the section ‘Want to know more?’.

Option 4 - a bridge at Belvedere

A new road bridge between Belvedere and Rainham.

For a larger version of Option 4 click here

Overview – a bridge at Belvedere

A bridge at Belvedere would provide a new link across the river, connecting to roads in Belvedere and Rainham. We developed this option following our analysis of the issues raised in our last consultation, which ran from October 2012 to February 2013, and in light of our increased understanding of the growing pressures facing east London.

The bridge would extend the existing local road network across the River. It would carry two lanes in each direction: one for general traffic and one for buses and heavy goods vehicles. The main bridge structure would be about 2,100 metres long.

The bridge would be open to all road users, including cyclists and pedestrians. It would also open up opportunities for new cross-river public transport links and could help to stimulate growth in the North Bexley and London Riverside opportunity areas.

As with any other public highway, the bridge would be open 24 hours a day under normal conditions.

Timescales

It would take about four years to construct a bridge at Belvedere. The land required for a bridge at Belvedere is not safeguarded; therefore construction of the new bridge could extend beyond 2025. All timings are indicative.

New link roads – a bridge at Belvedere

We would build new roads to link the bridge to the existing road network. On the north side of the river, the new road would connect to the A13 in the vicinity of the Marsh Way junction. On the south side, a new access road would connect to the A2016 in the area of the Picardy Manorway junction.

Costs

It would cost from £500m-£900m to build the new bridge and around £0.5m each year to operate and maintain the crossing.

These high up-front costs but low ongoing operation and maintenance costs mean that in the long-run a new bridge here could cost less than the ferry-based options.

Belvedere is a long way from Woolwich. We would need to consider whether it was necessary to retain and, because of its age, replace the current Woolwich Ferry service.

Traffic impacts

Journey times across the river would be reduced significantly compared with existing crossing options.

Depending on the level of charge, a new bridge at Belvedere could carry up to 1,500 to 1,650 vehicles per hour in one direction at the busiest time. This would result in changes in traffic across a wide area of east and southeast London.

The map below shows routes which would experience increases or decreases in traffic during the morning peak period. Purple lines show where traffic could reduce and orange lines show where traffic could increase. Roads not highlighted would not be likely to see significant change.

For a larger version of this map click here

In the morning peak the new bridge would provide a more direct route for traffic wich currently has to travel via the Dartford Crossing, and to a lesser extent the Blackwall Tunnel. This would reduce traffic on the inner A13, A2 and Dartford Crossing with increases on the outer A13, the A2016, the A3016 and on local north-south routes through the Belvedere area in the London Borough of Bexley. There might also be some traffic impacts on local roads. Impacts in other periods are described in supporting reports.

These changes do not take into account the complementary traffic management measures we would implement if this option was adopted, such as reviewing traffic light timings. Further consultation would be undertaken in relation to these.

Impacts on the environment – a bridge at Belvedere

Expected changes in traffic patterns would lead to changes in traffic noise and airborne vehicle emissions. There would be small reductions in areas where traffic falls, while there could be small increases in areas where traffic rises or where new roads would be constructed. While further work is necessary to confirm impaxcts on smaller local roads, our initial analysis suggests that the introduction of a new bridge would not lead to a noticeable change in vehicle emissions. It is also unlikely that most of the surrounding area would experience any increase in noise, though some roads would experience slight increases.

Building a bridge at Belvedere could lead to some disturbance of natural habitats. We would carefully plan construction to minimise this as far as practicable, and would consider creating alternative habitats if necessary. We would ensure that any contaminated soil uncovered during construction was safely isolated, and, if necessary, disposed of.

Economic benefits

A new bridge at Belvedere would significantly improve access and opportunities for businesses and residents in east London. For example, by reducing travel time to centres of employment and businesses across the river, it could bring over 120,000 more businesses and over 190,000 more jobs within an average 37 minute commute of Belvedere. A new bridge could also support regeneration in north Bexley and Havering and support the creation of new homes in the North Bexley and London Riverside Opportunity Areas.

Detailed impacts

We have published a number of technical reports which describe the expected impacts in detail. For further details and all reports and technical details please see the section ‘Want to know more?’.

Want to know more?

If you would like to know more, you might find our supporting factsheets useful. We have prepared a factsheet which sets out how the various effects of the new crossing options have been assessed. A range of more detailed technical documents on the impacts of the new crossing options is also available. These set out the traffic and environmental impacts of the new crossings, and describe how we determined which crossing options should be included in this consultation.

The factsheets and other documents are available here

TfL staff will also be available at a series of roadshows to answer any of your questions.  These are being held as follows:

Venue

Date 1

Date 2

CEME Innovation Centre

Sat 19 Jul, 11am - 4pm

Wed 30 Jul, 1pm - 7pm

Woolwich library (Woolwich Centre)

Mon 21 Jul, 1pm - 7pm

Sat 26 Jul, 11am - 4pm

Gallions Reach shopping park

Wed 23 Jul, 1pm - 7pm

Sat 2 Aug, 11am - 4pm

Broadway Shopping centre, Bexleyheath

Thu 24 Jul, 1pm - 7pm

Sat 30 Aug, 9am - 2pm

Vicarage Fields shopping centre

Tue 29 Jul, 10am - 5.30pm

Sat 6 Sep, 10am - 5.30pm

 

Due to popular demand, we have organised two further roadshow events, to be held as follows:

Venue

Date

Belvedere Community Centre, Mitchell Close, Belvedere

Saturday 9 August, 11am – 4pm

Thamesmead Morrisons, Twin Tumps Way, Thamesmead

Saturday 23 August, 11am – 4pm

 

Areas

  • All Areas

Audiences

  • Public
  • Stakeholders
  • Local residents
  • Local businesses
  • Schools
  • London Boroughs
  • Coach Operators
  • Taxi trade
  • Transport for London

Interests

  • River Crossings