Have your say on the proposed Dingwall Road Loop tram extension in Croydon

Closed 28 Jun 2015

Opened 18 May 2015

Results Updated 7 Feb 2017

Update - 9 October 2015

Transport for London (TfL) has published the report on the spring 2015 public consultation. Thank you to all those who responded and left their views. The consultation received 379 responses, including 12 stakeholder responses. 76% of respondents supported the proposals in principle, while 14% were against. The report is included below and includes the answers to questions and issues raised during the consultation.

Click here for the Dingwall Road Loop spring 2015 consultation report (PDF)

Having considered the comments received during the consultation, TfL has decided to develop the Dingwall Road loop scheme in readiness for a Transport and Works Act Order (TWAO) application for powers to construct, operate and maintain the new loop. TfL anticipates making the application in 2016.

Overview

Update - 9 October 2015

Transport for London (TfL) has published the report on the spring 2015 public consultation. Thank you to all those who responded and left their views. The consultation received 379 responses, including 12 stakeholder responses. 76% of respondents supported the proposals in principle, while 14% were against. The report is included below and includes the answers to questions and issues raised during the consultation.

Click here for the Dingwall Road Loop spring 2015 consultation report (PDF)

Having considered the comments received during the consultation, TfL has decided to develop the Dingwall Road loop scheme in readiness for a Transport and Works Act Order (TWAO) application for powers to construct, operate and maintain the new loop. TfL anticipates making the application in 2016.

The details of the consultation can be found below.

Update ends

Update - 17 June 2015

We have today updated the Construction section of this page.

Click here to go direct to the Construction section

Update ends

What are we proposing?

We propose to extend the tram network in Croydon, by building a new loop to the east of the town centre. An extension would enable us to run additional tram services to and from the town centre, without creating a bottleneck at East Croydon station and without compromising the reliability of the service through the existing town centre loop – the most congested part of the network. In November 2014 we asked for views on the principle of a new loop and for comments on three different route options. Support was high, with 72% of respondents stating that in principle they supported a new tram loop to sustain reliability and improve capacity. Of the three options presented, Option 1 was the most popular with 56% support. A report on the 2014 Public Consultation is available here.

Dingwall Road Loop autumn 2014 Consultation Report

Following the consultation, we have developed option 1 further and we now return to seek your views on a more detailed scheme.

Why are we proposing a loop?

Croydon is undergoing one of the largest town centre regeneration projects in London. The proposed Dingwall Road Loop would compliment the next phase of public realm improvements in the area being undertaken by Croydon Council, for which funding assistance is being sought from TfL and the Greater London Authority. The public realm improvements made by Croydon Council as part of their ‘Connected Croydon Programme’ will include new pedestrian crossings and improvements to footways, cycling provision and shop frontages. More information on the programme is available on the Croydon Council website

Demand for Tramlink is in the region of 31m passenger journeys per year. We expect this to nearly double by 2030. The current infrastructure would not be able to accommodate the anticipated growth in demand while maintaining current service levels. We need to invest in the tram service and make choices about how the service will look and operate by 2030. Transport for London (TfL) has developed a Tram 2030 Strategy, for delivering a series of improvements across the network. Extra platforms at Wimbledon and double tracking at Mitcham are both already under construction and the Dingwall Road Loop is the building block to further staged improvements including:

  • Another new turning loop on the west side of the town centre. After buying additional trams, the two turning loops would enable us to run additional services to the east and west of the town centre, without compromising the reliability of the rest of the network. Loops on either side of the town centre would also keep service disruption to a minimum in the event that the existing town centre loop became impassable for any reason
  • A second tram platform at Elmers End, providing the ability to run more trams on the town centre loop in the future

 

Our 2030 Strategy also includes:

  • Extensions to South Wimbledon and Sutton
  • Double tracking from Wandle Park to Reeves Corner
  • Double tracking or additional loops on the Beckenham Junction branch
  • Investing in new trams, including longer trams and longer tram stops if feasible

 

You can find out more information about our 2030 Tram strategy here

Benefits of the Dingwall Road Loop

  • It is the first step for any future improvements, as it adds network capacity without contributing to additional congestion in the town centre
  • Builds resilience into the tram network, helping ensure that future tram services can meet the forecasted growth in passenger demand while delivering the same levels of reliability as the current service
  • Accommodates the additional demand that will be generated by the Croydon Limited Partnership development of the Whitgift Centre and other developments in Croydon, through the provision of a new tram stop at Lansdowne Road and a newly refurbished stop at Wellesley Road.

 

How would the loop work?

For trams timetabled to use the loop, travelling west, the tram would leave East Croydon and turn right into Dingwall Road, travelling northbound to the junction with Lansdowne Road. After turning into Lansdowne Road, trams would call at a new tram stop on the north side of the highway, near Emerald House. On departing the new tram stop on Lansdowne Road, the tram would then head west, turning onto Wellesley Road, where it would join the southbound carriageway, before re-joining George Street and travelling back east.

For a larger version of this map click here

Future tram services

One of the main questions which people asked us in 2014 was how existing services would be affected by the scheme; and whether customers travelling west towards the town centre could still access local shops without changing trams. We are now in a position to provide further information.

We currently operate 22 trams per hour (tph) through the town centre. With the new loop in place we are currently considering running 19tph around the existing loop and 5tph around the Dingwall Road Loop, a total of 24tph serving Croydon centre. With later stages of the 2030 Strategy, more services could be operated when additional trams are purchased. (Please see the Tram 2030 Strategy for further details).

Branch

 

Current timetable

(May 2015)

With the

Dingwall Loop

New Addington

8tph

10tph (5 along Dingwall Loop)

Beckenham Junction

6tph

6tph

Elmers End

8tph

8tph

Total

22tph

24tph

For a larger version of this map click here

To achieve this, we need to re-cast the timetable across the network once Dingwall Loop is available. Our current intention is for Wimbledon services to operate to Beckenham Junction and Elmers End as now, with New Addington services alternating between the existing town centre loop and the new Dingwall Loop, but increasing in frequency:

  • Everyone from the eastern branches would have a direct service
  • available to Church Street and beyond
  • The Beckenham branch would gain through services to Wimbledon – there are more passengers travelling from this branch across Croydon towards the Wimbledon branch than there are from the New Addington branch – so this pattern better fits demand
  • Overall, the proportion of passengers needing to interchange would not alter. At least 86% of passengers would continue to have a direct service to their destination at least every 12 minutes
  • We intend for all Wimbledon services (12tph from 2016) to continue
  • to operate across the town centre. Another loop is planned for the west of the town centre, to turn back additional services from a potential extension to South Wimbledon; mirroring what is proposed at Dingwall Road

 

Alternative Schemes

We received suggestions for alternatives to the Dingwall Loop during the 2014 consultation, including lengthening tram stops and running longer trams.

Considerable thought has been given to the lengthening of trams and tram stops and they form part of our longer term planning towards accommodating passenger growth by 2030. We have looked at options for single trams up to 43m long, as well as coupling two trams together.

Both options would require significant platform lengthening works across the network. This would require us to buy additional land, and would also have an impact on highway operations, particularly at junctions. Another key consideration is the statutory need to retain good access to trams for those with mobility impairments or pushchairs – which in some cases would force us to realign the track.

It is therefore much more cost-effective to increase frequency as far as possible before lengthening trams. Stop lengthening would cost many millions and could not be delivered for the cost of the Dingwall Road Loop, which is estimated at £27m and includes a £15m contribution from the Croydon Limited Partnership development. Feasibility of our aspiration to introduce longer trams will continue in line with our Trams 2030 Strategy.

Construction

TfL closely coordinates works to minimise disruption during construction. We have a dedicated forward planning team to manage the phasing of our works, helping ensure schemes work collaboratively with other construction work to minimise impact. We would ensure that residents and businesses are provided with advance notice of any potentially disruptive works. Discussions with interested parties in and around Dingwall Road are underway and will help inform our Code of Construction Practice, which would be used to help deliver the project in the event powers to construct and operate an extension are awarded.

The website was updated on 17 June 2015 to include further information on construction.

Work will take place in two stages, as shown in the indicative drawings below. The first drawing shows the areas we may require to undertake preliminary utility diversion work, before we commence the main construction works.

Click here for a copy of the utility drawing (PDF)

The second drawing shows which areas we might occupy during the main works. The utility works and the main works will be undertaken in phases to minimise disruption, and we won’t occupy all the areas shown in a drawing at any one time.

Click here for a copy of the Tram Pedestrian drawing (PDF)

The forward planning team will manage the phasing of the works to ensure any disruption to road users is kept to a minimum. The phasing of the work areas will be decided following discussions with developers in the area and by agreement with the local authority.

How would the scheme affect other road users

Lansdowne Road would become one-way westbound, which means buses would need to be re-routed. We will hold a separate consultation on potential changes to bus routes currently serving Lansdowne Road and Dingwall Road. The exit from Warpole Road onto Lansdowne Way would need to become Left-turn only. We will also take into account pedestrian movement requirements in the area between East Croydon station and the retail core, and develop the scheme with the aspiration to integrate it as much as possible with recent and forthcoming public realm improvements. Information on impacts during construction and the operation of the loop are available in our answers to questions raised during the 2014 consultation. This is included as Appendix H of the 2014 consultation report and is addressed in a factsheet below

Factsheet 1: Transport and Works Act Order

Factsheet 2: How the proposals could affect other road users

Factsheet 3: Rationale, option assessment and outcomes

Factsheet 4: Environmental Impact Assessment 

 

Areas

  • Bromley
  • Croydon
  • Merton
  • Sutton

Audiences

  • Public
  • Stakeholders
  • Local residents
  • Local businesses
  • Schools
  • London Boroughs
  • Coach Operators
  • Taxi trade
  • Transport for London
  • Taxi customers and other stakeholders

Interests

  • Trams
  • Tramlink